Grannell      Family History and Genealogy

 

 

The Grannells in Co. Wexford

1853

 

The Primary Valuation of Tenements for Co. Wexford was published in 1853. Unfortunately the 1851 census returns have not survived. Thus, giving rise to the Valuation being widely used as a census substitute. As it stands, this is the only detailed account of where people lived in nineteenth century Ireland, and what property they possessed.

 

However the government reports relating to the 1831, 1841, 1851, and 1861 censuses are available and combined with the valuation records are a useful in building up a picture of Co. Wexford in the first half of the 18th century.     

 

.  

 

 

Introduction

 The changing pattern of land ownership in Ireland

 

 

In 1750, the population of Ireland was 2.5 million. By 1804 the population had risen to 5.4 million. Of this an estimated 8,000 to 10,000 were landed proprietors.

 

Between 1750 and 1815, subletting, subdivision and long leases were the norm. Long leases had prevented landlords from increasing rents during this period. Moreover, agricultural prices rose steeply during the same period.

 

By the beginning of the 19th century leases of 21 and 31 years were common. However, 1815 saw a fall in the price of corn and the beginning of a period of general agricultural depression.

 

By 1831, the population had increased to 6,801,827 persons. The increased demand for land, increased rents to an extent not warranted by falling agricultural prices. By 1841 the population had increased to 8.2 million. 

 

During this period the following classification applied to agricultural holdings in general.

 

 

Classification

 

Holding

Large farmer

greater than 15 acres

 

Small Farmer

5-15 acres

 

Cottiers

less than 5 acres

 

Agricultural

Labourers

Landless

 

 

Between 1846 and 1853 the country saw approximately 70,000 evictions and in 1849 an approximate rental value of £2,000,000 (from a total of £13 million) was under the control of the Court of Equity. Large numbers of landlords became insolvent and the middleman system collapsed.

 

Between 1850 and 1880, 5,000,000 acres changed hands, the biggest transfer taking place between 1850 and 1855.    

 

Between 1885 and 1891, approximately £10,000,000 was advanced to tenants to become purchasers. 1870 to 1896 saw the purchase of 73,805 holdings, a total of 2.5 million acres for £24.18 million. This represented 10% of the total acreage.

 

The Wyndnam Act, 1909 would result in a revolutionary change in land ownership. By 1922, 9,459 estates, 270,396 holdings or 9 million acres were sold under these land acts for £85.9 million.

 

However this period did not see the end of landlordism in Ireland. In 1923, over 3,000,000 acres were still in landlord ownership e.g. the Earl of Courtown, having 13,000 acres in Co. Wexford.

 

The Free State Land Act,1923, called for all untenanted land in congested areas to be vested in the Land Commission. This was largely ineffective. In 1931 a new land act was passes to speed up the process started by the 1923 act. By the late 1930’s the Free State land acts had transferred 3.1 million acres or 113,800 holdings, for £20.8 million.

 

 

 

 

The Wexford Grannells, 1853

 

 

 

The following table is a list of every Grannell recorded in the 1853 Valuation of Ireland. As mentioned earlier, of the 30 Grannell households in the country 24 are located in Co. Wexford.

 

Grannell surname

County

 

Number of

Households, Griffith’s Valuation

 

Wexford

24

Wicklow

2

Galway

2

Carlow

1

Kildare`

1

 

Total

 

30

 

 

The 24 Grannell’s recorded are listed in the next Table. I have also included the townland and parish.

 

 

 

#

First name[1]

 

Parish

Townland

 

1

John

St. Mary’s

Enniscorty

2

James[2]

Kilmallock

Ballina Lower

3

Moses

Kilmallock

Kilmallock

4

William

Templeshannon

Templeshannon

5

Thomas

Templeshannon

Templeshannon

6

James

Edermine

Tincoon

7

Patrick

Ballylannan and Clongeen

Rochestown and Cloongeen

8

John

Horetown

Hopefield

9

Denis

Ballycanew

Bolinready

10

Margaret

Ballycanew

Cranacowen

11

Denis

Toome

Clonmore

12

Judith

Kilmuckridge

Ballinlow

13

Patrick

Monamolin

Courtballyredmond

14

Thomas

Killincooly

Ruaunmore

15

John

Killincooly

Tinteskin

 

 

 

 

16

Edward[3]

Ardcolm

Ballinacoolamore

17

Dorah

Ardcolm

Johnstown

18

James

Ardcolm

Pollregan

19

John

St.  Margaret’s

Coolrainy

20

Thomas

St.  Margaret’s

Coolrainy

21

John

Kerloge

Kerloge

22

Thomas

Templeshannon

Templeshannon

 

 

 

 

 

 

According  to Grenham. Whitechurch and Ballycarney alos contain Grannells?

Investigate

 

 

 

The size of each Grannell holding, to the nearest acre and the immediate lessor is recorded in the next table. 

 

 

 

 

First name[4]

 

Immediate lessor

Area

1

John

Frances Pounden

House and yard

2

James[5]

George Talbot

House and 88 acres

3

Moses

John Peare

House and 3 acres

4

William

Rep. of Thomas Thomson

House, yard and small garden

5

Thomas

John Stacy

House, yard and small garden

6

James

James Power

House and 73 acres

7

Patrick

Francis A. Leigh

House and 28 acres

8

John

Lydia M. Goff

House and 17 acres

9

Denis

John B. Hassett

House and 132 acres

10

Margaret

Edward Irvine

House and 28 acres

11

Denis

Rev. Charles Hamilton

House and 117 acres

12

Judith

Charles Murphy

House only

13

Patrick

James Doyle

House only

14

Thomas

Frances Irvine

Rev. William Corvan

Land only 1 acre

House and garden

15

John

 

House and 25 acres

 

 

 

 

16

Edward[6]

Hamilton K.G. Morgan

House and 6 acres

17

Dorah

James Murphy

House only

18

James

George Dixon

House and 2 acres

19

John

 

House and 3 acres

20

Thomas

John Grannell

House and small garden

21

John

David Codd

House and 22 acres

22

Thomas

Anne Vardy

House and yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the next section I will take a brief look at all the above. For a more detailed family history please consult the index to individual family histories at the end of this article.

 

I have also included a brief topographical description of each parish in 1837.[7]

 

 

 

Wexford in the 1830’s

 

On his journey through Ireland in 1836, Henry Inglis recorded the following account of his impression of Wexford town and county.

 

‘I found a good deal to please me in and about Gorey. There are a considerable number of resident landlords in this part of Wexford; and the property of the absentee landlords is under good management. The condition of the people too, especially the farmers, is upon the whole better than in Wicklow; though here also anything approaching to constant employment for the laborer, is not to be had, and the wages of labor are scarcely higher.

 

Most of the cabins I visited in this neighborhood boasted a pig, in many cases the result of a loan (loan society). Most of them were in sties, but some in cabins, where as Paddy says ‘he has the best right to be’ since its he ‘that pays the rint’. ‘We’ll be quite comfortable when we get the stye up’ said one young women not twenty years of age who with two children and the pig, occupied a very clean neat cabin; her husband was a laborer at tenpence a day, without diet. The secret of these very nice cabins, I found, to be  a premium offered by an agricultural society, of from 10s to 2 l., for the cleanest and most comfortable cottages.   

 

 

A German traveler in Ireland in 1834, made the following observation, ‘The people of Wexford County generally are said to be a money getting people; and in the system which prevails extensively with regard to marriages among the rural population there is considerable evidence of this.

 

The disposal of farmers daughters is a matter of regular traffic - acre for acre, pound for pound, and so great is the difficulty of marrying girls without portions that it is no unusual thing to find farmers, who are in comfortable circumstances living as poorly as the common labourer, or ract-rent tenant of a few acres, in order that they may save a few hundreds for ‘fortuning off’ their girls’.[8] 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Grannells in Enniscorty Town, 1853.

 

 

 

Enniscorty belonged to the absentee landlord Lord Portsmouth.

 

In 1853, there were four Grannell households in the town of Enniscorty.

 

John occupied 19 Back Street, in the parish of St. Mary’s. In the parish of Templeshannon there was, William occupying 159 Shannon Street, Thomas at 9 Craheen Road and another Thomas at 4 Kilagoley Road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Kilmallock Grannells

 

 

 

James Grannell, Kilmallock, Ballina Lower

 

Kilmallock

 

In 1837, the parish of Kilmallock, a area of 3,748 statute acres, was chiefly under cultivation, except for the Bog Of Ittay.[9] The principal seats are, Ballikeel, J. Maher esq., Kilmallock, Mr. R. Peare and Willmount, Mrs. J. Goodall. The RC division forms part of the parish of Crossabeg and has a new chapel at Ballymurn. Some 20 children attend a local Catholic school. Some remains of an old church in a large burial ground.     

 

In 1851, the population of this townland was 54 people. These 54 persons represented by 9 families, occupied 8 of the 9 houses in the townland.

 

 

 

James Grannell, Kilmallock, Ballina Lower

 

 

 

Occupiers, living in Ballina Lower

(9 houses)

 

Immediate

Lessor

House and land

Area

 

 

a-r-p

James Grannell

George Talbot

88-3-7

Elizabeth Dempsey

George Talbot

124-3-35

Henry Furlong[10]

George Talbot

63-3-27

Laurence Neil

George Talbot

41-4-39

Elizabeth Dempsey

George Talbot

11-3-15

Margaret Dempsey

Elizabeth Dempsey

House only

John Quirk

James Grannell

6-0-8

Bartholomew Costelloe

Elizabeth Dempsey

1-1-5

Vacant

James Grannell

House only

 

 

 

 

By the standards of the time James Grannell would have been classed as a large farmer. He has three houses, one vacant, one let to John Quirk and the other his home, all in Balllina Lower. A direct descended of James owns and farms this property today. By chance his name is also James Grannell.

 

The Landlord was George Talbot[11], all 342 acres of this townland being his property.   In 1877, his property in Co. Wexford amounted to 1,342 acres.[12]

 

 

Moses Grannell, Kilmallock, Kilmallock.

 

 

Moses rented a house and 4 acres of land from John Peare. The Peare’s leased their kands in this parish from Sir James Power, Bart, 350 acres in all. Humphrey succeeded John Peare and in 1881 both Humphrey and Moses were cancelled from the Valuation Book.

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

The Ardcolm Grannells

 

 

 

Ardcolm and Castlebridge 1837

 

Ardcolm is a parish in the Barony of Shelmalier East. Its population in 1837 was 790 persons. The main road from Wexford to Dublin passed through the parish, at this time. The principal church was situated in the village of Castlebridge and was erected in 1764 on the site of an ancient castle. The RC division forms part of the parish of Castlebridge where the chapel is situated. A parochial school was established under the auspices of the Rev. J.W. Stoke was attended by 50 to 60 children.

 

Castlebridge is chiefly remarkable for its extensive trade in corn. Nearly the whole produce of the district (county south of Arklow) is deposited here in order to avoid the tolls on Wexford bridge. There are very extensive stores, mills and malt houses belonging to Mr. Patrick Breen. The stores are capable of holding about 40,000 barrels of corn and about 65,000 are exported annually. About 3,000 barrels of malt are also made here annually.

 

Edward Grannell, Ardcolm, Ballinacoolamore.

 

 

The townland of Ballinacoolamore has 9 occupied houses in 1853.

 

Occupiers,

living in Ballinacoolamore

(9 houses)

 

Immediate

Lessor

House and land

Area

 

 

a-r-p

Mary Ryan

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

2-1-5

Margaret Dempsey

Mary Ryan

House only

James Breen

Mary Ryan

House only

Patrick Murphy

Mary Ryan

31-3-30

Gregory Waddock

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

32-2-31

Matthew Murphy

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

20-0-34

John Brien

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

4-2-33

Edward Grannell

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

6-0-34

Raymond Murphy

Hamilton K.G.Morgan

37-1-25

 

 

 

    

 

This was the extent of Edward’s holding and he would have been classed as a small farmer. Edward emigrated to Canada in 1853. In 1855 John Rossiter occupied this holding.

 

 

 

Hamilton Knox Grogan Morgan

 

The principal Landlord was Hamilton K.G.Morgan.[13] Ballinacoolamore formed part of what was known as ‘Lords Monck’s Estate’. Hamilton Knox Grogan Morgan was a descendant of the Grogan’s of Johnstown Castle. The family’s property was extensive and widely scattered in tracts of moderate size throughout the county. In 1877, the family estate in Co. Wexford amounted to 9,413 acres.

 

The  townland of Ballinacoolamore was forfeited by Thomas Esmonde in the Cromellian Settlement, 1655. The townland at the time is recorded as containing 242 acres. The Grogans aquired Ballinacoolamore (Ballinacolly) when the Esmonde Estates were forfeited, after the Cromwellian Wars. 

 

 

Dorah  Grannells , Ardcolm, Johnstown

 

Dorah Grannell occupied Lot 3(b) in the townland of Johnstown, in the parish of Ardcolm. Dorah’s house was rented from James Murphy. James occupied Lot 3(a) and rented 120 acres for Hamilton Knox Grogan Morgan. At the time this lot contained three houses, occupied by James Murphy, Dorah Grannell and Charles Redmond.

 

James Grannell, Ardcolm, Pollregan.

 

James rented a house and 2 acres of land from George Dixon. George also live in Pollregan and farmed 153 acres rented from John G. Hatton. In 1853 there are four houses in this townland, two occupied by the Dixon’s, one by James and the other by the Swift’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Grannells in St. Margaret’s

 

The Raven and Skreen, 1837

 

St. Margarets of Raven is a parish in the Barony of Shelmalier. In this parish seaweed is generally used for manure and turf is obtained on the shore at low water, inside the sand hills are extensive cockle beds. At Curracloe there is a coast guard station. A fishery off the coast gives employment locally and Curracloe has long been a resort for sea bathing. The RC chapel is at Kilmacoe and 30 children attend the parish school. Kilmacoe is the principal seat of Cadwaller Waddy Esq..

 

The inhabitants of the parish of Skreen are partly employed in the herring  fishery at Curracloe. Balliroan Lodge is the principal seat and the property of R.S. Guiness Esq., There is a dispensary for the poor located here and 60 children attended a local private school. The residence of the RC curate is located on the site of an old chapel.

 

I came across a newspaper article praising the industry of a Nicholas Doyle of Curracloe, who was described as a fisherman. He gave full employment to 5 men and a further 13 men and 4 women during the curing season.[14]

 

 

 

John and Thomas Grannell, Coolrainy.

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation lists 26 houses in this townland. John Grannell occupied lot 17(a), a house and 3 acres of land and renting from John on 17(b) was Thomas Grannell, with a house and small garden.

 

Also in the same parish an area of 7 acres, described as bog, is rented jointly by John Grannell, John Creane, John Cullen and John Brien.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Killincooly Grannells, Union of Gorey

 

 

 

John Grannell, Tinteskin.

 

 

John Grannell of Tinteskin, had two houses and 25 acres of land which he rented from Loftus A. Byran. The second house John rented to William Conroy.  

 

The property was passed from John to Thomas Grannell and by 1879 was occupied by Michael Grannell. Another house was  added to this lot and rented to Thomas Kinsella.

 

By 1889 the property had passed from Michael to Margaret Doran and eventually to Elizabeth Doran in 1898. By 1908 Elizabeth Doran had become Elizabeth Boggan. Although she no longer resided in Tinteskin she rented her two houses to Mary Kirvan and Bridget Keane.

 

By 1936, the house and 24 acres of land were acquired by Art Murphy.[15]    

 

 

Thomas of Ruaunmore and the Village of Ford (Tinteskin).

 

 

Thomas rented an acre of land from Frances Irvine in the townland of Ruaunmore but lived in the village of Ford, were he rented a house and garden from the Rev, Willaim Corvan. The village contained 10 houses and was, in 1851 occupied by the households of Ellen Laffen, Thomas Grannell, Lawerence Byrne, Mary Lacy, James Dempsey, Thomas Redmond, Michael Bryan, Mary Kelly, James Canavan and Michael Bryan.

 

 

 

The Ballycanew Grannells

 

 

Denis Grannell of Bolinready has a house and 132 acres of land, which he rents from John B. Hassett (lot 6a).

 

Margaret Grannell of Cranagower has a house and 28 acres of land, which she rents from Edward Irvine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Grannell, Clongeen and Ballylannan.

 

 

Clongeen and Ballylannan are adjoining parishes.

 

Patrick lived in the townland of Clongeen and rented a house and 3 acres of land from Francis A. Leigh.

 

Also from Francis Leigh, Patrick rented 25 acres of land in the townland of Rochestown in the parish of Ballylannan.

 

 

 

 

 

John Grannell, of Horetown.

 

The parish of Horetown borders on both the parish of Ballylannan and Clongeen.

 

John Grannell rented four separate lots from Lydia M. Goff. A house and 18 acres of land in the townland of Hopefield.

 

 

 

 

     

 

John Grannell, Kerloge, Kerloge

 

 

John rented a house from David Codd in the townland of Kerloge. David Codd had a house, corn mill, and 22 acres of land in the same townland. Mary Sparr occupied the only other house in this townland.

 

 

 

 

Judith Grannell, Kilmuckridge.

 

 

Judith lived in the townland of Ballinlow and rented as house from Charles Murphy. Charles in turn rented 27 acres of land from William Foster. Judith has the only house on this lot and Charles Murphy lives elsewhere.

 

 

 

 

Patrick Grannell, Monamolin.

 

 

Patrick Grannell of Courtballyredmond rented a house from James Doyle. This townland contains a number of small holdings. Henry Bolton with 96 acres, is the only large farmer.

 

 

 

 

 

Denis Grannell, Toome

 

 

 

Denis Grannell of Clonmore rented a house and 117 acres of land from the Rev. Charles Hamilton. Denis is the largest farmer in the townland.

 

 

 

 

The whole spectrum of society in 19th century Wexford is represented here. Any person claiming descent from the Wexford Grannell’s, of the 19th century would have been related to one of those mentioned in this survey.  I have examined in detail the descendants of two of those listed in the Primary Valuation, one having emigrated to Canada in 1853 and the other family who, after 150 years are still living in the same town land and now owners of land, on which their ancestors were once tenant farmers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A

 

 

 

Wexford, Ballaghkeen and Ballina Lower, population

 

 

The population of Wexford in 1821 was 170,806 persons. The barony of Ballaghkeen contained 26,260 inhabitants, representing 5,019 families. The parish of Killmallock (or Kilmologue as it was called in the 1821 census) contained 903 persons or 174 families, living in 169 houses. The majority of the working population was employed in agriculture.

 

In 1831, the population of the county had increased to 182,713. At this time the Barony of Ballaghkeen had 27,867 inhabitants or 5,208 families. The parish of Killmallock contained 1,159 person or 209 families, living in 209 houses. 187 of these families were engaged in agriculture. A further 20 families were engaged in trade, manufacture and handicrafts, as it was described in the census report.

 

The Barony of Ballaghkeen , 1831.

 

Barony of Ballaghkeen

 

Parish

Desc.

Total

Pop.

Total

Fam.

Ardamine

Parish

1,535

267

Ballyhuskard

Parish

2,487

475

Ballyvaldon

Parish

1,301

263

Blackwater part of

Village

78

22

Ballyvalew

Parish

890

172

Castle Ellis

Parish

1,750

328

Donaghmore

Parish

2,448

405

Edermine

Parish

1,135

188

Oilgate

Hamlet

86

14

Kilcormack part of

Parish

1,406

272

Killancooly

Parish

1,123

186

Kilmuckridge

Village

81

16

Kilkevin

Parish

399

72

Killenagh

Parish

704

124

Killila

Parish

500

103

Blackwater part of

Village

177

45

Killisk

Parish

1,036

199

Kilmichaelogue part of

Parish

542

93

Kilmuckridge

Parish

1,191

214

Kilmuckridge part of

Village

189

35

Kilmalogue[16]

Parish

1,159

209

Kilnemanagh

Parish

759

128

Kiltennel

Parish

1,137

207

Melina

Parish

1,040

208

Oulart

Parish

161

39

Monamolin

Parish

823

156

Skreen

Parish

516

97

Tara Hill

extra parochial

Parish

471

97

Templeshannon

Parish

1,163

209

Enniscorty

part of

Town

1,180

365

 

 

 

 

 

 

Between 1841 and 1851, the population of the parish of Kilmallock decreased as the following table shows.

 

Parish of Kilmallock

 

Townlands

 

1841

persons

 

1851

persons

Ballina Lower

77

54

Ballina Upper

150

131

Ballinkeel

45

60

Balltkelly

145

128

Balltlucas

113

86

Ballymurn Lower

75

48

Ballymurn Upper

63

80

Ballybrigadane

54

47

Ballysilla

215

198

Cloonasheeoge

59

57

Coole

25

16

Garryvarren

130

102

Island

-

-

Kilmallock

149

91

Lacken

98

87

Mullaghdarrig

10

9

 

Totals

 

1408

 

1194

 

 

 

 

 

Griffith’s Valuation, Parish of Kilmallock,1853

 

 

According to Griffiths Valuation (published in 1853) there were 179 households in the parish of Kilmallock. The surnames and the number of each household is tabled below.

 

Surname

No.

 

Surname

Notes

 

Annaghan

1

 

Barlow

3

English 16th century

Barron

1

Ir, Kilkenny

Bishop

1

Generally English

Bolger

3

Ir

Brien

3

Ir

Burns

1

Ir

Cardiff

1

Wex rare 13th cent

Carroll

1

Ir

Carty

2

Ir

Caulfield

1

17th planter

Challoner

1

English

Cloney

?

 

Codd

1

Wex old English 13th cent

Commins

?

Ir

Connor

5

Ir

Corroy

?

 

Cosgrave

1

Ir

Costelloe

1

Ir

Cullen

5

Ir

Cummins

2

Ir

Curran

3

Ir numerous Leitrim 7th cent

Darcy

1

Anglo-Norman, Leinster

Dempsey

5

Ir, dispossessed Laois-Offaly 17th cent

Denton

1

Wex rare English 

Doherty

1

Ir

Donohoe

1

Ir

Dooly

2

Ir

Doran

1

Ir, Brehon family

Doyle

14

Wexford, Norse origin, 1,169 families in Wex

Dumphy

2

Ir

Durney

1

Ir, rare Kilkenny

Easeman

?

 

Elliott

1

English, associated with plantation

Fortune

1

Ir, originated Carlow

Furlong

5

Anglo-Norman, 13th cent, Wick&Wex

Furnill

?

 

Goodall

1

Wex English 16th cent

Gordan

1

Scottish – 17th Plantation name

Grady

1

Ir

Grannell

2

Ir, rare Wexford

Harpur

2

Anglo-Norman, Wex&Kilkeny

Hart

1

Ir

Heffron

?

 

Herran

?

 

Hogan

1

Ir

Jones

1

Numerous all areas, English settlers name

Kavanagh

11

Ir

Kehoe

12

Ir, bardic family to the O’Byrnes of Wicklow

Keogh

?

As Kehoe

Kinchella

1

Ir,Very rare Antrim

Leary

9

Ir

Loakman

1

Ir, very rare Kildare

Loffman

?

 

M’Donnell

?

 

Maher

1

Ir

Martin

3

Generally English planter name

Murphy

22

Ir

Neill

2

Ir, Ulster

Nolan

1

Ir

O’Brien

1

Ir

Parl

1

?

Peare

3

English, Wexford rare

Quirk

2

Ir, Tipp before Norman Invasion

Quirke

3

As Quirk

Rath

3

Norman, rare Wex & Louth

Redmond

6

Ir, rare Offaly, Laois Wex, branch of the O’Bourkes of Connaught

Reid

2

Generally English

Reilly

1

Ir, Breifne O’Reilly, 1759 households in Co. Cavan

Rick

?

 

Roe

1

Generally English, Rowe

Roche

8

Norman

Ronan

1

Ir

Rowan

1

Generally English

Ryan

1

Ir

Scott

1

Scottish

Shiel

?

 

Sinnott

4

Anglo-Norman, Wex 13th cent

Shannon

1

Ir

Stewart

1

Scottish

Sullivan

1

Ir

Sunderland

3

English, Wex 18th cent

Tyrell

1

Anglo-Norman

Walsh

1

Welsh

Whelan

4

Ir

Whitford

1

Scottish, rare

Bolton

1

Ir, Ulster

 



[1] Individual family histories have been compiled for those names with footnotes attached.

[2] James & Aiden Grannell, Ballina Lower, Ballymurn, Enniscorty, 2003, direct descendants of this James.

[3] James Grannell, Michigan, USA, 2003, direct descendant of this Edward.

[4] Individual family histories have been compiled for those names with footnotes attached.

[5] James & Aiden Grannell, Ballina Lower, Ballymurn, Enniscorty, 2003, direct descendants of this James.

[6] James Grannell, Michigan, USA, 2003, direct descendant of this Edward.

[7] Lewis, Samuel, Topographical History of Ireland, 1837.

[8] Inglis, Henry D., 1834

[9] The name of this bog has nowadays been forgotten locally; in 1642 it was described as the ‘receptacle and place of concourse of ye Rebels’ and during the Commonwealth was considered the ‘hiding place of Tories and Rapparees’. In 1835, a gigantic horned fossil  was dug out of the same bog. 

[10] My Note (some of the above had holdings in other townlands in the parish e.g Henry Furlong had 13 acres in Ballina Upper, need to investigate further) – also include topographical detail of parish and townland for 1830-60 

[11] George Talbot of Knockmullen, CB,JP Co. Wex.,Chief Commissioner of DMP (1871- 1882), former Capt. 13th Light Infantry, in 1832 married Mary O’Beirne of Jamestown, Co. Leitrim.

His father was James Talbot, Knockmullen, Co. Wex.,JP for Co. Wex., Lieut. In the First Reg. Of Foot Gaurds, born 1794, married mary Sutton of Summerhill, Co. Wex., in 1824 and died in 1852.

[12] Independent, Wexford, 1877, 24th March, supplement, Owner’s of land of one acre and upwards, Estate of peers in the UK.

[13] Article relating to Mr. Morgan, The Independent, Wexford, Feb 19th 1851,

“Good Landordism – H. K. Grogan Morgan Esq. MP,

 

We have been informed by Mr. Walter Hally P.L.G. of Tramore that Mr. Grogan Morgan of Johnstown Castle County Wexford gave a reduction to his tenantry of 15 per cent on the last half years rent, on the lands of Knockindiff in this County. Two of the tenantry named Whelan and Keefe, owed four and a half years rent, which were forgiven on giving up their farms, he also gave them through Mr. Hally, £20 each,  to enable them to emigrate with their families to America – They are tenants at will.

 

The Waterford Mail”

 

[14] The Independent, Wexford, Jan. 1st., 1851.

[15] History acquired from the Cancelled Books in the Land valuation Office, Irish Life Building, Abbey Street, Dublin.

[16] Today called Kilmallock